Old Plastic Model Kits

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Maircraft Nieuport 17 - Solid Wood Model Airplane, 1/48, S23

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good++

$26   

Maircraft was originally founded in the early or mid 1930s by Gordon Christoph and went by the name Aircraft Model Company. The company produced a typical line of solid 'profile cut' kits that required the usual high talent levels for carving and finishing. A former Comet Model Airplane & Supply Co. salesman, Jack Mair, bought the company in the early 1940s and renamed it Maircraft. This company was one of the handful of solid kit producers who issued models in a consistent 1/48 scale during the 1930s and 1940s (others included Hawk and Dyna-Model). This lead to one of the most desirable and rare model kits ever produced in the USA - the wood/plastic 1/48 United DC-3 model issued immediately after World War 2. Other than the P-61 and a few other Maircraft offerings, most were simple kits that sold for the low price of about 35 cents and gave the owners many hours of pleasurable work. This kit features a full size plan with instructions steps, fuselage that is about 70% cut, profile cut wings and tail parts and fully formed wheels. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes decals and instructions.

Maircraft Spad 13 - Solid Wood Model Airplane - (Spad XIII), 1/48, S19

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$26   

Maircraft was originally founded in the early or mid 1930s by Gordon Christoph and went by the name Aircraft Model Company. The company produced a typical line of solid 'profile cut' kits that required the usual high talent levels for carving and finishing. A former Comet Model Airplane & Supply Co. salesman, Jack Mair, bought the company in the early 1940s and renamed it Maircraft. This company was one of the handful of solid kit producers who issued models in a consistent 1/48 scale during the 1930s and 1940s (others included Hawk and Dyna-Model). This lead to one of the most desirable and rare model kits ever produced in the USA - the wood/plastic 1/48 United DC-3 model issued immediately after World War 2. Other than the P-61 and a few other Maircraft offerings, most were simple kits that sold for the low price of about 35 cents and gave the owners many hours of pleasurable work. This kit features a full size plan with instructions steps, fuselage that is factory cut to about 70% complete, profile cut wings and tail, fully formed wheels and clear material for the windshield. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes decals and instructions.

Maircraft Taylorcraft - Solid Wood Model Airplane, 1/48, S-17

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$38   

Maircraft was originally founded in the early or mid 1930s by Gordon Christoph and went by the name Aircraft Model Company. The company produced a typical line of solid 'profile cut' kits that required the usual high talent levels for carving and finishing. A former Comet Model Airplane & Supply Co. salesman, Jack Mair, bought the company in the early 1940s and renamed it Maircraft. This company was one of the handful of solid kit producers who issued models in a consistent 1/48 scale during the 1930s and 1940s (others included Hawk and Dyna-Model). This lead to one of the most desirable and rare model kits ever produced in the USA - the wood/plastic 1/48 United DC-3 model issued immediately after World War 2. Other than the P-61 and a few other Maircraft offerings, most were simple kits that sold for the low price of about 35 cents and gave the owners many hours of pleasurable work. This kit features a full size plan with instructions steps, fuselage that is about 70% cut, profile cut wings and tail feather, strut material and fully formed wheels. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes instructions.

Hudson Miniatures 1904 Oldsmobile - Lil Old Timers Quickie Kit, 1/32

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$38   

These kits have a very interesting history. When the Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' burst upon the hobby scene in 1951, they started a hobby revolution. Plastic model kits were not new in 1951, but successful mass marketing of plastic kits was new. The sensation swept the country, and Gowland & Revell could not make the kits fast enough. The fact that the public was buying these models shocked the successful hobby establishment. One such manufacture was Hudson Miniatures. In the 1940s, Hudson had established a name in making 1/16 scale 'Old Timer' models of automobiles. These were excellent kits with wood and metal parts, but a high degree of skill was required to finish the wood parts. In the late 1940s, they added some injection molded plastic parts (usually acetate wheels and lamps) but all other parts remained wood and cardstock. When Hudson saw what was happening with the Highway Pioneers, he began to design his own 1/32 scale line called 'Lil Old Timers', which hit the stores in 1954. An early paper fold-out catalog shows 18 models including some real gems like the 1910 International Harvester Passenger Car, 1911 Brush Delivery Truck and 1906 Columbia Electric Car just to name a few. The line was bought by Revell a short time after it's release, and Revell did reissue some (but not all) of the kits. As you would expect from Hudson, this is a nice kit with excellent moldings and detail for the time. Molded in a brilliant deep red plastic. Never started and inventoried complete with all parts and instructions.

Revell 1909 Stanely Steamer Highway Pioneers - US Antique Series, 1/32, H34-69

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$38   

1954 issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'US Antique' series. This was the first time that a Highway Pioneers box showed a unique illustration of the kit inside; prior to this they were generic. Molded in medium green plastic. This kit has never been started. All parts are still in the factory sealed bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Aurora M4A3E8 Sherman Medium Tank, 1/48, 072

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$39   

Hard-to-find 1/48 scale armor kit in the block 'AURORA' logo box from 1976. Features elevating gun, rotating turret, figures, opening hatches and operating treads and bogies. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes decals and instructions. NOTE: the antenna is broken in two; both parts are present.

Revell 1908 Buick 10 Rumble Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H40

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$39   

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1952 early issue molded in bright red plastic. This is from the issues produced by Gowland & Gowland as it carries their 'balloon' logo on the side. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with all pieces present and includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1910 Cadillac Limousine Highway Pioneers - Series Two, 1/32, H39

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$36   

1952 early issue molded in light blue plastic. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. The parts have been inventoried complete and includes instructions. NOTE: one wheel is a different color plastic; it is from another issue of the same kit. NOTE: the hat (for the figure) is also a different color and is from another issue of the same kit; it has been glued to the original figure (not the one in this kit). These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1910 Pierce Arrow Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H48-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$40   

1953 issue, the first year for the 'Series Three' Highway Pioneers. The kit is molded in a stunning, bright red glossy acetate plastic. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. The parts are still in the internally sealed factory bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1911 Rolls Royce Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H46-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$37   

1953 issue, the first year for the 'Series Three' Highway Pioneers. Molded in a beautiful dark burgundy plastic. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. The parts are still in the internally sealed factory bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell Olds Delivery Van Highway Pioneers - (Oldsmobile), 1/32, H44

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$36   

1953 early issue molded in white plastic and it includes colorful decals for the van sides for the 'Gowland's Bakery'. This is from the issues produced by Gowland & Gowland as it carrier their 'balloon' logo on the side. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts present and includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1903 Model A Ford Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H36

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$38   

1952 first issue in the 'Series One' yellow box. This issue has no part number on the box and it also has the 'Parents' Magazine Seal' on the box sides; this must be the very first appearance of this seal on any model kit. Also, there is no Gowland & Gowland 'balloon' logo on the side. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in gloss yellow plastic. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory sealed in a small wax bag; the larger parts were never sealed and have been inventoried complete. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1913 Mercedes Highway Pioneers - Series 4, 1/32, H54-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc++

$49   

1954 original issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'Foreign Car' series. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in gloss dark green plastic. This kit has never been started. All parts are still in the factory sealed bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1913 Mercedes Highway Pioneers - Series 4, 1/32, H54-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$44   

1954 original issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'Foreign Car' series. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in gloss dark green plastic. This kit has never been started. All parts are still in the factory sealed bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1913 Mercedes Highway Pioneers - Series 4, 1/32, H54-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$39   

1954 original issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'Foreign Car' series. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in gloss dark green plastic. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions present. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1953 Jaguar XK-120 Highway Pioneers - Series 4, 1/32, H56-69

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$39   

1953 original issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'Foreign Car' series. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in light green plastic. This kit has never been started. All parts are still in the factory sealed bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1900 Packard Highway Pioneers - Official Construction Kit Of The Cub Scouts And Boy Scouts Of America Issue, 1/32, H33-69

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$49   

1952 first issue in the 'Series One' yellow box with the rare Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts emblems. The same text and logos are duplicated on the right short side and on the left side it says "National Supply Service - Boy Scouts of America" This early issue has the Gowland & Gowland 'balloon' logo on the long sides. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in bright red plastic and the tires & wheels are molded in black. This kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with with all pieces present. NOTE: the instructions are photocopies. The original instructions are missing. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1900 Packard Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H33

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$36   

1952 first issue in the 'Series One' yellow box. This kit was sold new at one of the famous "Neisner's 5 cent and $1 Stores" in 1952 for 69 cents (from the price tag on the bottom of the box). This kit actually has no part number on it; I have given it the H33 as the Packard is usually know by that. This early issue has the "Parents' Magazine Seal" on the long sides which is very rare; it was removed very quickly and is possibly the only Revell kit to wear this badge. The Gowland & Gowland 'balloon' logo is not present on this box. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in bright red plastic and the tires & wheels are molded in black. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory sealed in the wax paper bag; the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Hudson Miniatures 1914 Regal Lil Old Timers - Quickie Kit, 1/32

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair+

$39   

Rare. When the Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' burst upon the hobby scene in 1951, they started a hobby revolution. Plastic model kits were not new in 1951, but successful marketing had never been done before. The sensation swept the country, and Gowland & Revell could not make the kits fast enough. The fact that the public was buying these models shocked the existing hobby establishment. One such manufacture was Hudson Miniatures. In the 1940s, Hudson had established a name in making 1/16 scale 'Old Timer' models of automobiles. These were excellent kits with wood and metal parts, but a high degree of skill was required to finish the wood parts. In the late 1940s, they added some injection molded plastic parts (usually acetate wheels and lamps) to the series but the rest of the kit remained wood. When Hudson saw what was happening with the Highway Pioneers, he began to design his own 1/32 scale line of all-plastic cars called 'Lil Old Timers', which hit the stores in 1954. An early paper fold-out catalog shows 18 models including some real gems like the 1910 International Harvester Passenger Car, 1911 Brush Delivery Truck and 1906 Columbia Electric Car just to name a few. The line was bought by Revell a short time after it's release, and Revell did reissue some (but not all) of the kits. As you would expect from Hudson, this is a nice kit with excellent moldings and detail for the time. The kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete including instructions. The 1914 Regal Coupe is perhaps the rarest of all cars ever built in America. It was underslung, which was rare for the time, and the body was all wood and similar to old horse-drawn carriages of colonial times. The design was sometimes called a Colonial Coupe. The large car seated only two people and could hit 40 mph with it's 25 hp engine.

Premier 1903 Ford Model A - Old Time Autos Issue, 1/32, 101

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$32   

This model dates from the early or mid 1950s. Due to the instant and wide-spread popularity of the Revell Highway Pioneers, many companies jumped on the car model bandwagon and Premier was one of them. Molded in pale yellow with black wheels. Never started. The parts are still in the internal factory sealed bags and includes instructions. I have seen this kit molded in many colors - ivory, deep red, black and yellow with perhaps more colors to be discovered. The box top array of kits offered appears to be suspiciously like the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers line. Although the parts are factory sealed with clearly-labeled Premier instructions, it is possible that Premier was receiving kit parts from Revell or Gowland and then putting them in their own boxes with their own instructions. Such practices were common later such as MPC and Airfix, all UPC models and more.