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  Revell Model Kits

Revell Oldsmobile Delivery Van Highway Pioneers - (Oldsmobile), 1/32, H44

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc++

$36   

1953 early issue molded in white plastic and it includes colorful decals for the van sides for the 'Gowland's Bakery'. This kit has never been started. All parts are still factory sealed in the original 'krinkle' bag and it is complete with decals and instructions. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell Sears Buggy Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H45-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc++

$37   

1953 early issue molded in green plastic. This is from the issues produced by Gowland & Gowland as it carrier their 'balloon' logo on the side. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1907 Renault Limousine Highway Pioneers - Series Four, 1/32, H53-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$36   

1953 early issue molded in salmon plastic. This is from the issues produced with Gowland & Gowland as it carrier their 'balloon' logo on the side. The model has not been started. The parts are still sealed in the original 'krinkle' bag and the kit is complete with instructions. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1913 Mercedes-Benz - Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H54-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc++

$39   

1960 issue molded in green plastic. The kit has never been started. Internal factory sealed bag including instructions. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1903 Cadillac Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H35-79

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$36   

1960 issue hardbox with full artwork; Highway Pioneers prior to this year simply had generic artwork and an ink stamped name on the box ends was the only way to identify the contents. This kit has never been started. All parts are still sealed in the factory bag. Includes instructions. The box would rate much higher than 'very good++' but there is age foxing on some of the box side panels. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1915 Fiat Tourer Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H55-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$36   

1953 early issue molded in red acetate plastic. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes instructions. This is from the issues produced with Gowland & Gowland as it carrier their 'balloon' logo on the side. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell Oldsmobile Delivery Van Highway Pioneers - (Oldsmobile), 1/32, H44

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair+

$38   

1953 early issue molded in white and black plastic and it includes colorful insignia for 'Gowland's Bakery.' This kit has never been started. All parts are still factory sealed in the original 'krinkle' bag and it includes the instructions. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1929 4 1/2 Liter Bentley Highway Pioneers - US Antique Series, 1/32, H63-69

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc+

$38   

Original issue dated 1954 in 'excellent+' condition inside and out. The US Antique series was the first one to have real box art for the exact kit inside. This kit is from old hobby shop stock and has never been sold retail until now; but the box does has light wear as shown. Inside the box, it has not been started. All the parts are still factory sealed in the original 'krinkle' bag. Includes instructions. This is from the issues produced with Gowland & Gowland as it carries their 'balloon' logo on the box top a the lower right. Not long after this, the Gowland logo would disappear completely, leaving only the Revell logo. It is also worth noting that this is one of the first non-generic Highway Pioneers boxes. Earlier boxes were all the same, with the kit number and car stamped on the side, usually with a red or black rubber stamp. This box is completely dedicated to the Bentley kit, and even has advertisements for very early Pre-S issue Revell 1954 ship and aircraft kits on the long sides. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1915 Fiat Tourer - Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H55-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$42   

1953 early issue molded in red acetate plastic. This kit has never been started. All parts are still sealed in the factory 'crinkle' bag with instructions. This is from the issues produced with Gowland & Gowland as it carrier their 'balloon' logo on the side. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1913 Mercedes Factory Display - Built Up With Base - Highway Pioneers, 1/32

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$56   

This is a Revell-factory built display made for hobby shop promotional use around 1954. The intention was simple- if hobby shops would purchase and display these attractively built displays, potential buyers would see them and immediately purchase the kit. This probably worked well; but the hitch was that these displays were expensive for the 1950s, so few hobby shops could afford them. And once in public, there was heavy attrition; parts easily broke, and when the new kits came out next year, they were thrown away to make room for more. Which makes condition of this one even more exceptional. The actual model is very neatly built and Revell factory airbrushed. You can always tell the Revell-built models by the airbrushing and the way the parts were masked. It is 100% complete and has no breaks and no repairs. Even the base is in very good condition. However, 1/2 of the paper nameplate is missing as well as the clear cover. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1910 Cadillac Limousine Factory Display - Built Up With Base - Highway Pioneers, 1/32

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$59   

This is a Revell-factory built display built for hobby shop promotional use around 1954/55. The intention was simple- if hobby shops would purchase and show these attractively built displays, potential buyers would see them and immediately purchase the kit. This probably worked well; but the hitch was that these displays were expensive for the 1950s, so few hobby shops could afford them. There were other difficulties too. Once in public, there was heavy attrition; parts easily broke, and when the new kits came out next year, they were thrown away to make room for more. Which makes condition of this one even more exceptional. The actual model is very neatly built and Revell factory airbrushed. You can always tell the Revell-built models by the airbrushing and the way the parts were masked. The actual car is complete, nothing is broken and there are no repairs. Even the base is in very good condition; however the clear cover is missing and the car could use a cleaning. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.

Revell 1907 Renault Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H53-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$39   

1960 issue hardbox with full artwork; Highway Pioneers prior to this year simply had generic artwork and an ink stamped name on the box ends was the only way to identify the contents. This kit has never been started. All parts are still sealed in the factory bag. Includes instructions. The box would rate slightly higher than 'very good' but there is age foxing on the box side panels. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1910 Cadillac Limousine Highway Pioneers - Series Two, 1/32, H39

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$44   

1952 early issue molded in light blue plastic. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. All parts are still sealed in the factory bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1911 Rolls Royce Highway Pioneers, 1/32, H46-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$34   

1953 issue, the first year for the 'Series Three' Highway Pioneers. Molded in a beautiful dark burgundy plastic. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. This kit has never been started. The parts are still in the internally sealed factory bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1913 Mercedes Highway Pioneers - Series 4, 1/32, H54-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$39   

1954 original issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'Foreign Car' series. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in gloss dark green plastic. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions present. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell 1913 Mercedes Highway Pioneers - Series 4, 1/32, H54-89

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$34   

1954 original issue of the famous Highway Pioneers 'Foreign Car' series. These issues feature the same 5 car artwork on every box; the only way to identify the contents was an ink-stamped name on the box ends. Molded in gloss dark green plastic. This kit has never been started. All parts are still in the factory sealed bag. Includes instructions. These kits have a fascinating history. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream and never made the top 10 list of boys activities. Spurred on by the nation-wide aviation craze in the 1920s, many became modelers and built flying or static wooden models of airplanes, ships, trains, automotive and other subjects. Basic kits existed, but many of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s when the Gowland & Gowland/Revell Highway Pioneers became the sales sensation of the year. Demand was so great that the factories could not keep up and almost overnight 'model building' was mainstream. The phenomenon of the 'Highway Pioneers' kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles fit the bill: they could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real cars. The success of the Highway Pioneers lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the late 1950s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and many adult males too!

Revell Highway Pioneers Five Kit Gift Set - 1903 Model A Ford / 1910 Model T Ford / 1909 Stanley Steamer / 1903 Cadillac / 1900 Packard, 1/32

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$139   

Very rare. From 1952 or '53. This is one of (if not) Revell's first gift set. It is Gowland-produced with no part number. Gowland designed and molded these kits as well as providing the box artwork (signed D.K. Gowland) and instructions - Revell did the marketing. Inside, the kit is correct with all cardboard dividers, all small parts still factory sealed in the correct wax paper bags, cars molded in red, black, dark blue, yellow and green, tires molded in black and correct instructions. The models have never been started. All kits have been inventoried 100% complete with all parts present. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. By the late 1910 and early '20s, many dedicated modelers were building flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. By the 1930s, the 'Aviation Craze" had taken hold of this country and kits appeared everywhere. However, it was estimated at the time that at least 80% of these were never sucessfully completed (and fewer than that flown). That changed in the early 1950s with the advent of plastics and affordable injection molding equipement. The phenomenon of the all-plastic Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles were completely molded to shape in color and could be built in an hour after dinner. When complete, they looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys...and adult males as well!

Revell 1893 Duryea Highway Pioneers - US Antique Series, 1/32, H61-69

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$44   

1954 'US Antique' series issue molded in black plastic. This kit has never been started and is inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions present. This is from the issues produced with Gowland & Gowland as it carrier their 'balloon' logo only on the box top. Not long after this, the Gowland logo would disappear completely, leaving only the Revell logo. It is also worth noting that this is one of the first non-generic Highway Pioneers boxes. Earlier boxes were all the same, with the kit number and car stamped on the side, usually with a red or black rubber stamp. This box is completely dedicated to the Duryea kit, and even has advertisements for the early Revell 1954 ship and aircraft kits on the long sides. Before the 1950s 'model building' never made the top 10 list of boy's activities. Hobbies were nothing new to America in the 1930s/40s, but they were not mainstream. Shortly after the turn of the century, many dedicated modelers built flying or static airplanes, ship, train, automotive or other subjects. Basic kits existed, but the majority of these models were built from scratch, which demanded a high talent level developed from years of experience. That changed in the early 1950s. The phenomenon of the Revell/Gowland & Gowland 'Highway Pioneers' car kits was a significant force in proving that model building as a hobby could have mass appeal, provided that the kits were easy enough to build and finish. These 1/32 scale vehicles could be built in an hour after dinner and looked much like the real car. The Highway Pioneers series lead to the production of other subjects in plastic and the effect was revolutionary. By the early 1960s, model building was the #1 past time of American boys.