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Hudson Miniatures 1914 Ford Model T Fire Engine

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$95   

Sale Pending
Email for availability.

Very Rare. Large (1/16) scale fire engine kit. Dated 1949 and very highly detailed for that time. Features numerous wooden parts that are either die-cut, factory saw cut or machined, wood stock, metal stock, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel and lanterns, metal stock and parts, die-cut cardstock and two big sheets of excellent plans/instructions. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the sealed bag. The parts that were not factory sealed have been inventoried complete including instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1910 International Harvester Passenger Car, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$72   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, headlamps, spotlight, running lights and other accessories and wooden main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. James Melton. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes instructions. As a note, few people even knew that International Harvester even made a passenger car. Not many were produced and very, very few are in existence. Jim Melton's car, the car examined by Hudson engineers, was likely given to him as a promotion as he was a popular opera singer and the star of International Harvester's radio show 'Harvest of the Stars'. The car was very solidly built to last and reportedly gave excellent service. Why IH did not pursue production is not known. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Brush Model C Delivery Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$52   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features numerous die-cut and machined/cut to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel and other accessories, metal louvered hood, metal stock and parts and die-cut cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits are excellent, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. Austin Clark. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes decals and instructions. Please NOTE that the Long Island Automotive Museum decals are fine but the Furniture ones are stuck hard to each other. The Brush Delivery Model C was manufactured by Brush Runabout Company, which was a division of the famous United States Motors. It sold for $650 and was powered by a one cylinder 64 HP engine linked to a gear-set type two speed + reverse multiple disc clutch transmission. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Ocio Creativo Westliche Berliner Vorortbahn Berlin No. 40Tram Street Car 1901 - G Scale - (OcCre), 1/24, 51004

Wood and Metal Model Kit,   Box Condition: Sealed NM

$89   

Still factory sealed. Beautiful, true scale and very highly detailed model with laser cut hardwood parts, cast metal and photoetched metal fittings, completely finished hardwood wood details and more. Measures 390 mm long (about 15.4 inches long) when assembled. Can be motorized with an optional motor kit for operation on your G scale railroad. Other kits in this superb series include at least 7 different historical trolley / street cars, dioramas for the street cars, ships, small boats, two wagons, early steam locomotives and rolling stock. This model is of motor car tram No. 40, 1901. This vehicle was the oldest of the Berlin electric motor car trams. Number 40 originally operated in the West Berlin suburbs as part of the "Westliche Berliner Vorortbahn." It is the type of motor car tram called "Neu-Berolina," and this type became very popular and saw widespread use. In 1903 the side and front wall protectors were installed around the running gear, to avoid people being knocked down and dragged under the wheels. With the unification of Berlin's municipal transport companies in 1920, this tram ended up belonging to the company "Berliner Strassenbahn" and was renamed No. 3851, on later on A 114. The tram was manufactured by Boker & Cie, Remscheid and remained in service from 1901 right through to 1943. It was fitted with two 16. 7 kW AEG motors, measured 28 feet long, 6.5 feet wide and 11 feet high. When empty she weighed in at 8.5 tonnes. It had sitting room for 20, plus another 12 standing.

Ocio Creativo C.E.M.T. Madrid Electric Traction Company Tram Street Car Cibeles Cangrejo 1901 - G Scale - G Scale (OcCre), 1/24, 51002

Wood and Metal Model Kit,   Box Condition: Sealed NM

$89   

Still factory sealed. Beautiful, true scale and very highly detailed model with laser cut hardwood parts, cast metal and photoetched metal fittings, completely finished hardwood wood details and more. Measures 395 mm long (about 15.5 inches long) when assembled. Can be motorized with an optional motor kit for operation on your G scale railroad. Other kits in this superb series include at least 7 different historical trolley / street cars, dioramas for the street cars, ships, small boats, two wagons, early steam locomotives and rolling stock. The "Cibeles" model represents a Madrid tram belonging to the C.E.M.T.\. (Madrid Electric Traction Company). These trams were originally painted red, which was why people called them "cangrejos" (crabs), a nickname that has stuck until the present day, despite the fact that way back in 1908, when they were brought from the C.E.M.T. by the Sociedad General, the color was changed to yellow. This cangrejo is a tram from 1901, belonging to the series 1-20. It could carry 15 passengers sitting in crossways wooden benches, 7 standing on the driver's platforms and 10 on the other. She was fitted with 2 A-B-60 Schuckert 30 HP electric motors. Each tram was manned by a driver and a conductor.

Ocio Creativo Barcelona Metropolitan Transport Tram Street Car 1904 Tibidabo - (OcCre), 1/24, 51003

Wood and Metal Model Kit,   Box Condition: Sealed NM

$89   

Still factory sealed. Beautiful, true scale and very highly detailed model with laser cut hardwood parts, cast metal and photoetched metal fittings, completely finished hardwood wood details and more. Measures 415 mm long (about 16.3 inches long) when assembled. Can be motorized with an optional motor kit for operation on your G scale railroad. Other kits in this superb series include at least 7 different historical trolley / street cars, dioramas for the street cars, ships, small boats, two wagons, early steam locomotives and rolling stock. The "Tramvia Blau" tram is, at the present time, the oldest operational tramline in Europe, still running the same route as on the date of her inauguration back in 1901. In all that time it has never ceased to provide a service to the public. From her inauguration up to 1979 she belonged to Sociedad Anonima Tibidabo and then, in 1981, was taken over by the TMB (Barcelona Metropolitan Transport). The present model was built in 1904, has a capacity for 48 passengers, 32 sitting in crossways double seats and another 16 standing on the platforms. The actual tram weighs 9,650 kg, is fitted with two 45 HP electric motors, two breaks, one chain operated and the other electric, and is capable of reaching a top speed of 13.5 kph.

Hudson Miniatures 1909 Stanley Steamer Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$64   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories and wooden main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1902 Franklin Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$69   

Dated 1949 and highly detailed for that time. Early multi-media kit consist of numerous die-cut, saw cut and machined wood parts, beautiful plastic wheels, steering wheel, lanterns, metal parts and stock, die-cut card stock and large, excellent plans/instructions. Includes full size plans and instructions. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed, and all others have been inventoried 100%. Complete with full-size plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Cadillac Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$55   

Dated 1949 and very highly detailed and prefabricated for that time. Large scale kit measures 7 inches long when built. Features plastic wheels, steering and lamps, die cut and factory machines wooden parts and a small number of metal and accessory parts. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried present including highly detailed plans/instructions. The 1903 Cadillac was the very first production Caddy and the car that began the legend. This particular model was capable of 30 mph with four passengers. Its 11 hp engine could negotiate a 45% grade with ease. The car was first test driven on Oct 17, 1902. In January of '03 it was taken to the New York Automobile show where orders for 2286 were placed. By mid week, Cadillac announced that were 'Sold Out.' This makes sense when you realize that in 1903 all cars had a rough machine-shop or 'garage' fit and finish; the new Cadillac looked like a Jewel in comparison. Later that year the Cadillac placed or won challenges and reliability contests worldwide and earned the status of 'Standard of the World.' Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1904 Oldsmobile Curved Dash Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$64   

Dated 1949 and very well detailed for that time. Big scale kit features numerous die-cut and machined-to-shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels and lanterns and a small number of metal parts, accessories and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and all other parts have been inventoried present. Includes large, excellent, detailed plans with instructions. The 1904 Oldsmobile was the first production car in America and was considered very dependable. To emphasize its simplicity and dependability, Oldsmobile invented the slogan 'Nothing to Watch but the Road.' Gus Edward's hit song of 1905, 'In My Merry Oldsmobile' was a tribute to the popularity of the car. It was powered by a single cylinder engine of 4.5 horsepower. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1906 Columbia Electric Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$59   

Dated 1949 and very well detailed for that time. Big scale kit features numerous die-cut and machined-to-shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, leaf spring assemblies and lanterns and a number of metal parts, accessories and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and all other parts have been inventoried present. Includes large, excellent, detailed plans with instructions. The Columbia Electric was manufactured by the Electric Vehicle Co. of Hartford, Conn. It had a 1.5 HP motor with chain drive and three speeds. It cost $1350 in 1906 and tipped the scales at 1660 pounds. We think of electric cars as 'new' today but they are anything but. There were many advantages (and manufacturers) of these cars. There were no fuel lines and radiators to freeze in the winter and no overheating in the summer. They used no smelly gasoline and produced no odor when operated. The complete lack of noise made them popular with the ladies and the range was between 40 and 50 miles on a charge - not bad at all considering you could not very far anyway (on regular business or errands) in 1906. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Brush Model C Delivery Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$64   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features numerous die-cut and machined/cut to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories, metal louvered hood, metal stock and parts and die-cut cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits are excellent, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. Austin Clark. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed while the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete including two sheets of excellent plans/instructions. The Brush Delivery Model C was manufactured by Brush Runabout Company, which was a division of the famous United States Motors. It sold for $650 and was powered by a one cylinder 64 HP engine linked to a gear-set type two speed + reverse multiple disc clutch transmission. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Mercer Raceabout Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$68   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories and wooden and metal main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. J. Fetterolf of Buckingham, PA. This kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Please note, there are adult notes written on the plans to improve the accuracy of the model. The owner of these kits was a keen researcher and actually won a Hudson Miniature Old Timers Model Building Competition. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. The 1911 Mercer Raceabout is one of the rarest American cars. The Mercer was built in Trenton, NJ and powered by a 30 hp T head 4 cylinder engine. Displacement was 300.7 cubic inches and the car had a wet clutch four speed transmission. The car weighed 2,500 lbs and cost $2600 and could do 112 mph. The Mercer was perhaps the most famous sports car of the time. It was rugged, handled very well and had excellent performance.

Fador 1905 White Steamer, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$54   

Dated November of 1949. Very well detailed for that time. Features a large number of die-cut, machined and saw cut wooden parts as well as excellent plastic wheels, headlights, steering wheel, horn and lanterns. There are also metal parts, metal stock and die-cut cardstock parts. Includes full-size, superb fold-out instructions with multiple elevation drawings, numerous detail drawings and templates, two photos of the completed model and extensive instructions. The kit has never been started. NOTE: missing one die-cut cardstock part. Very easily made as the perfect pattern (the original cardstock sheet) is present, so simply trace to the outline to get the part. Inventoried with all other parts present. Fador was another maker of big 1/16 classic cars and competed with the bigger Hudson Miniatures. Fador called the line 'Smallersters' and the design & parts breakdown of the kits are very similar. The full name was Fador Mfg. Company and the address was 501E. Clinton St., Elmira, NY. Hudson Miniatures, launched in 1948, apparently beat Fador to the market by at least a year or more. Hudson's national success probably lead Fador to choose the same subject (antique cars) and in the same scale, 1/16. Hudson snatched up the most obvious classic automobiles for kit subjects, forcing Fador to select very carefully. Fortunately, they chose well and they are still the only models ever made of these subjects. There is no record of Fador making any plastic kits; the introduction and overwhelming popularity of the Revell/Gowland Highway Pioneers and the models that quickly followed probably drove them out of the market. This was the fate of most wooden kit manufacturers who did not make the transition. In 1949 the Fador line consisted of a 1909 Hupmobile Roadster, 1904 Cadillac Runabout, 1905 REO 4 Passenger Runabout and one kit that was "3 In 1' - it made one of the following: 1909 EMF Single Rear Seater, 1909 EMF Touring or EMF Roadster. The Baker Electric kit was introduced in 1950 and possibly others as well.

RedYCut US Army Trailer For Jeep or Truck, 1/24, 317

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$22   

From the 1940s. Ideal accessory for a jeep, truck, scout vehicle or any of the many wooden vehicles in this scale. Nice scale wooden kit featuring all cut out parts, fully formed wheels including spare tire, wire roof cover 'hoops,' army khaki color fabric for roof, small balance wheel at hitch, sandpaper and more. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes multi-view plans.

Mod-Ac US Army Searchlight - 800,000,000 Candle Power For Anti-Aircraft Defense, 1/24, 1044

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$36   

From the 1940s. Very nice scale kit and an ideal accessory for the various other vehicles and guns available in this scale. Features all hardwood parts (unless mentioned), hollow light enclosure (heavy cardboard), completely finished convex rear housing, clear plastic front lens, working support arms, detailed trailer with four completely finished wheels, junction box and resistor box, sandpaper and more. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes multi-view drawings, exploded assembly instructions and text instructions.

Leddy Amphibian Jeep Ford GPA, 1/14, A-60

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$79   

Rare. From the 1940s. Very large, true-scale model. Highly detailed for that time and measures 13 inches in length when built. The photo on the box top shows the actual built model. Features a great number of factory cut and shaped hardwood parts, fully formed hardwood wheels, metal stock as required, a sealed wax paper bag of small fittings of wood and metal, and more. The kit has never been started. The parts that were factory sealed are still in the sealed bags. The parts that were not factory sealed have been inventoried complete including full decals and two sheets of very well done plans with instructions. Not much is known of Leddy Model Industries except that they were located in Watsonville, California and their kits were of exceptional quality for that time. We know that Leddy made a VC-2 Victory Ship, a US Army Amphibian Jeep, kit number A-60 in large scale (1 3/4" = 5") and also A-50 US Army Jeep.' If you have any other information or have seen other kits, please email me.

Fador 1905 REO Runabout, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good++

$44   

SALE!! Rare kit dated 1949. Very well detailed for that time. Big-scale model features numerous die-cut, machined and saw-cut wooden parts, excellent plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lanterns and horn, other metal parts and metal stock and die-cut cardstock parts. Come with superb, large fold out plans that show four elevations drawings, many various detail drawings, a photo of the finished model and extensive text instructions. The kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with all parts. Please note, there are adult notes written on the plans to improve the accuracy of the model. The owner of these kits was a keen researcher and actually won a Hudson Miniature Old Timers Model Building Competition. Fador was another maker of big 1/16 classic cars and competed with the bigger Hudson Miniatures. Fador called the line 'Smallersters' and the design & parts breakdown of the kits are very similar. The full name was Fador Mfg. Company and the address was 501E. Clinton St., Elmira, NY. Hudson Miniatures, launched in 1948, apparently beat Fador to the market by at least a year or more. Hudson's national success probably lead Fador to choose the same subject (antique cars) and in the same scale, 1/16. Hudson snatched up the most obvious classic automobiles for kit subjects, forcing Fador to select very carefully. Fortunately, they chose well and they are still the only models ever made of these subjects. There is no record of Fador making any plastic kits; the introduction and overwhelming popularity of the Revell/Gowland Highway Pioneers and the models that quickly followed probably drove them out of the market. This was the fate of most wooden kit manufacturers who did not make the transition.

Hudson Miniatures 1909 Stanley Steamer Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$89   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories and wooden main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Brush Model C Delivery Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$75   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features numerous die-cut and machined/cut to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories, metal louvered hood, metal stock and parts and die-cut cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits are excellent, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. Austin Clark. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed while the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete including two sheets of excellent plans/instructions. The Brush Delivery Model C was manufactured by Brush Runabout Company, which was a division of the famous United States Motors. It sold for $650 and was powered by a one cylinder 64 HP engine linked to a gear-set type two speed + reverse multiple disc clutch transmission. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.