Old Plastic Model Kits

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De Kalb Toys Jeep / Napkin Holder / Steam Locomotive / Dump Truck / Farm Tractor / Candy Server / Candle Stick / Doll Dresser / Planter / Hot Rod (T Bucket), 47

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$24   

Early 1950s hardwood home craft kit that can build any of the items listed. Depending on your choices, you can build more than one. Includes large fold-out instructions that includes an illustration of each one, materials list, dimensions and assembly hints. Inside, the box is carefully packed full of hardwood thin boards, two sizes of rectangular hardwood stock, dowels and sandpaper. This is certainly not a pre-fabricated scale kit; you need to do all the cutting and the result is fairly well detailed, sturdy toy(s) or useful table items. It's an ideal project if you wish to do some light wood-working or introduce a youngster to the hobby. Never started and inventoried complete.

Douglas Model Studio Thrust Augmented Delta Missile NASA / Douglas

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$1395   

Very rare hand made model from the internal Douglas Studios. Measures 27 1/4 inches high and is made from wood and metal. Brass name plate says 'NASA / Douglas Thrust Augmented Delta'. Condition is beautiful. Decals are excellent. Paint is very good but there is typical hairline age cracking as the entire missile is primarily made of wood. No broken or missing parts.

Woodcrafter Kits MG Roadster / Cedar Rock Railroad Steam Locomotive And Tender Bagged, 124

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Sealed

$24   

SALE!! Includes both entry-level factory sealed wooden model kits. They are both perfect for younger children or as an introduction to wood model building. The MG has all parts precut and the Cedar Rock train model has every piece laser cut from Baltic Birch plywood and even includes glue.

F&B 1953 Chrysler Custom Imperial - Four Door Sedan - Wood And Metal Model, 1/25

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$46   

Very rare model from F&B Model Aircraft. In about 1953, F&B decided to branch out and produced at least three car kits - this '53 Imperial, a Jaguar XK120 and a Nash Rambler Convertible. The Imperial model measured out fairly close to 1/25 or 1/24 scale and features die cut balsa wood, pre-cut balsa blocks, wood stock as required, stamped aluminum bumpers, grill, bumper guards, emblems, tail lights, head lights, hubcaps and door handles, plastic steering wheel, completely finished rubber wheels, die-cut clear windows and light lenses and a large fold-out, highly illustrated step-by-step instruction sheet. Never started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes all paperwork. This kit is for modelers experienced in building all-wood kits from the 1940s and 1950s. It is not for beginners and scratch building skills are a must. F&B was located in Denver, Colorado.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Rambler - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$48   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, lights, other accessories and wooden main parts and occasionally metal parts and cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and the other parts have been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Cadillac - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$48   

Dated 1949 and very highly detailed and prefabricated for that time. Large scale kit measures 7 inches long when built. Features plastic wheels, steering and lamps, die cut and factory machines wooden parts and a small number of metal and accessory parts. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried present including highly detailed plans/instructions. The 1903 Cadillac was the very first production Caddy and the car that began the legend. This particular model was capable of 30 mph with four passengers. Its 11 hp engine could negotiate a 45% grade with ease. The car was first test driven on Oct 17, 1902. In January of '03 it was taken to the New York Automobile show where orders for 2286 were placed. By mid week, Cadillac announced that were 'Sold Out.' This makes sense when you realize that in 1903 all cars had a rough machine-shop or 'garage' fit and finish; the new Cadillac looked like a Jewel in comparison. Later that year the Cadillac placed or won challenges and reliability contests worldwide and earned the status of 'Standard of the World.' Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1900 Packard Roadster - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$68   

Dated 1949 and highly detailed for that time. Large-scale model measures 6.5 inches long when built. Early multi-media kit consist of numerous die-cut, saw cut and machined wood parts, beautiful plastic wheels, steering wheel, lanterns, metal parts and stock, die-cut card stock and large, excellent plans/instructions. Includes full size plans and instructions. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts and full-size plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Fador 1908 Baker Electric, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$62   

Rare kit dated August of 1950 and very well detailed for that time. Features mainly die-cut, machined and saw-cut wooden parts and excellent plastic wheels and lanterns, metal parts & stock and die-cut cardstock. includes excellent, large full-size fold-out plans with numerous elevations, a great many detail drawings and extensive instructions. The kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with all parts and paperwork present. We think of electric cars of new; nothing could be further from the truth. From 1900 to 1915 at least 25 well-known electric car manufacturers advertised vehicles which '...were clean, quite, stylish and easy to operate - the only car for a lady.' And how true this was! Early automobiles were notoriously noisy with dirty exhaust and the constant requirement to handle smelly gasoline by hand. The Baker Electric was one of the longer ranged models - when all six batteries were fully charge it could travel about 75 miles - acceptable even today for a commute. The wheelbase was 80 inches and it had a convertible top that could be lowered or raised. Fador was another maker of big 1/16 classic cars and competed with the bigger Hudson Miniatures. Fador called the line 'Smallersters' and the design & parts breakdown of the kits are very similar. The full name was Fador Mfg. Company and the address was 501E. Clinton St., Elmira, NY. Hudson Miniatures, launched in 1948, apparently beat Fador to the market by at least a year or more. Hudson's national success probably lead Fador to choose the same subject (antique cars) and in the same scale, 1/16. Hudson snatched up the most obvious classic automobiles for kit subjects, forcing Fador to select very carefully. Fortunately, they chose well and they are still the only models ever made of these subjects. There is no record of Fador making any plastic kits; the introduction and overwhelming popularity of the Revell/Gowland Highway Pioneers and the models that quickly followed probably drove them out of the market. This was the fate of most wooden kit manufacturers who did not make the transition. In 1949 the Fador line consisted of a 1909 Hupmobile Roadster, 1904 Cadillac Runabout, 1905 REO 4 Passenger Runabout and one kit that was "3 In 1' - it made one of the following: 1909 EMF Single Rear Seater, 1909 EMF Touring or EMF Roadster. The Baker Electric kit was introduced in 1950 and possibly others as well.

Hudson Miniatures 1914 Stutz Bearcat - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$85   

Well detailed, large 1/16 scale kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories, wooden and metal main parts and some die-cut cardstock parts as well. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. The instructions even warn that this kit will take more time than usual due to the 'tedious detail.' This kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Maxwell - Old Timers - First Issue, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$64   

Very rare first issue dated 1948 inside with the short-lived yellow box and with metal fittings. In one year this box was replaced with the common white version. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features die-cut and machined to shape wooden parts, beautiful die-cast metal wheels, steering wheel, side lanterns, carbide headlights and other accessories, metal stock and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes instructions and full size plans. In 1911, Maxwell was one of the 'Big Four' in the automobile industry. The 1911 Maxwell was considered very stylish and dignified and was widely used by doctors, lawyers and businessmen. It featured a 2 cylinder engine, 12 horsepower and had a folding top. These cars were usually painted with a bright red body, red wheels, black top and fenders and with shiny brass fittings and lights. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1909 Ford Model T Touring Car, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$62   

Early multi-media kit of wood, metal and plastic dated 1949 on the box. Large 1/16 scale kit measures 8 inches long when built. Very nicely detailed with all the complicated parts cast in yellow, light tan or ivory injection molded plastic. Includes full size plans and instructions. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very successful and popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well until the appearance of the much smaller and less scale Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved that they were not a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own small scale competition for them called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits'. The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Sales of wooden kits faltered in the next few years with the introduction of all-plastic injection molded cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue both lines. Today, these excellent kits are often the only large-scale models available of these early automobiles.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Rambler Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$46   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels & lights, a large number of wooden parts cut/turned to shape and occasionally metal parts and cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Maxwell - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$52   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features die-cut and machined to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, steering wheel, side lanterns, carbide headlights and other accessories, metal stock and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes instructions and full size plans but NOTE: the paper convertible top is a photo-copied reproduction. The original was missing, so I copied one from my collection for this kit. In 1911, Maxwell was one of the 'Big Four' in the automobile industry. The 1911 Maxwell was considered very stylish and dignified and was widely used by doctors, lawyers and businessmen. It featured a 2 cylinder engine, 12 horsepower and had a folding top. These cars were usually painted with a bright red body, red wheels, black top and fenders and with shiny brass fittings and lights. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1902 Franklin - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$62   

Dated 1949 and highly detailed for that time. Early multi-media kit consist of numerous die-cut, saw cut and machined wood parts, beautiful plastic wheels, steering wheel, lanterns, metal parts and stock, die-cut card stock and large, excellent plans/instructions. Includes full size plans and instructions. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed, and all others have been inventoried 100%. Complete with full-size plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Cadillac - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$42   

Dated 1949 and very highly detailed and prefabricated for that time. Large scale kit measures 7 inches long when built. Features plastic wheels, steering and lamps, die cut and factory machines wooden parts and a small number of metal and accessory parts. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried present including highly detailed plans/instructions. The 1903 Cadillac was the very first production Caddy and the car that began the legend. This particular model was capable of 30 mph with four passengers. Its 11 hp engine could negotiate a 45% grade with ease. The car was first test driven on Oct 17, 1902. In January of '03 it was taken to the New York Automobile show where orders for 2286 were placed. By mid week, Cadillac announced that were 'Sold Out.' This makes sense when you realize that in 1903 all cars had a rough machine-shop or 'garage' fit and finish; the new Cadillac looked like a Jewel in comparison. Later that year the Cadillac placed or won challenges and reliability contests worldwide and earned the status of 'Standard of the World.' Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Mod-Ac US Army Searchlight - 800,000,000 Candle Power For Anti-Aircraft Defense, 1/24, 1044

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$34   

From the 1940s. Very nice scale kit and an ideal accessory for the various other vehicles and guns available in this scale. Features all hardwood parts (unless mentioned), hollow light enclosure (heavy cardboard), completely finished convex rear housing, clear plastic front lens, working support arms, detailed trailer with four completely finished wheels, junction box and resistor box, sandpaper and more. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes multi-view drawings, exploded assembly instructions and text instructions.

RedYCut US Army Trailer For Jeep or Truck, 1/24, 317

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$22   

From the 1940s. Ideal accessory for a jeep, truck, scout vehicle or any of the many wooden vehicles in this scale. Nice scale wooden kit featuring all cut out parts, fully formed wheels including spare tire, wire roof cover 'hoops,' army khaki color fabric for roof, small balance wheel at hitch, sandpaper and more. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes multi-view plans.

Fador 1905 White Steamer, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$58   

Dated November of 1949. Very well detailed for that time. Features a large number of die-cut, machined and saw-cut wooden parts as well as superb die-cast metal wheels, carbide headlights, steering wheel, horn, plastic lanterns, metal parts & stock and die-cut cardstock parts. Includes full-size, superb fold-out instructions with multiple elevation drawings, numerous detail drawings and templates, two photos of the completed model and extensive instructions. The kit has been inventoried 100% complete with all parts and paperwork present. Fador was another maker of big 1/16 classic cars and competed with the bigger Hudson Miniatures. Fador called the line 'Smallersters' and the design & parts breakdown of the kits are very similar. The full name was Fador Mfg. Company and the address was 501E. Clinton St., Elmira, NY. Hudson Miniatures, launched in 1948, apparently beat Fador to the market by at least a year or more. Hudson's national success probably lead Fador to choose the same subject (antique cars) and in the same scale, 1/16. Hudson snatched up the most obvious classic automobiles for kit subjects, forcing Fador to select very carefully. Fortunately, they chose well and they are still the only models ever made of these subjects. There is no record of Fador making any plastic kits; the introduction and overwhelming popularity of the Revell/Gowland Highway Pioneers and the models that quickly followed probably drove them out of the market. This was the fate of most wooden kit manufacturers who did not make the transition. In 1949 the Fador line consisted of a 1909 Hupmobile Roadster, 1904 Cadillac Runabout, 1905 REO 4 Passenger Runabout and one kit that was "3 In 1' - it made one of the following: 1909 EMF Single Rear Seater, 1909 EMF Touring or EMF Roadster. The Baker Electric kit was introduced in 1950 and possibly others as well.

Hudson Miniatures 1909 Stanley Steamer - Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$78   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories and wooden main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions present. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1906 Columbia Electric Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$54   

Dated 1949 and very well detailed for that time. Big scale kit features numerous die-cut and machined-to-shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, leaf spring assemblies and lanterns and a number of metal parts, accessories and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and all other parts have been inventoried present. Includes large, excellent, detailed plans with instructions. The Columbia Electric was manufactured by the Electric Vehicle Co. of Hartford, Conn. It had a 1.5 HP motor with chain drive and three speeds. It cost $1350 in 1906 and tipped the scales at 1660 pounds. We think of electric cars as 'new' today but they are anything but. There were many advantages (and manufacturers) of these cars. There were no fuel lines and radiators to freeze in the winter and no overheating in the summer. They used no smelly gasoline and produced no odor when operated. The complete lack of noise made them popular with the ladies and the range was between 40 and 50 miles on a charge - not bad at all considering you could not very far anyway (on regular business or errands) in 1906. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.