Old Plastic Model Kits

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  Aurora Model Kits

Aurora Atomic Submarine Nautilus SS571, 1/242, 500-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$179   

Rare, Brooklyn-produced, early 1950s U-Ma-Kit. This was Aurora's first naval model. Molded in the correct glossy very dark gray plastic and includes a display stand and decals to match the box art. Never started and complete with all parts, remarkable 'excellent' condition decals and 'near mint' instructions. Even the original factory tissue packing paper is present. The box has excellent color, four solid corners with no repairs, no fading and no price tags. The only tape is the factory sealing tape on the long sides. There is light general shelf wear and edge wear as shown.

Aurora SSN585 Skipjack - World's Fastest Atomic Submarine, 1/228, 711-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$125   

Hard-to-find first Aurora issue of the famous Skipjack submarine. Dated 1959 and carries the correct oval sunburst logo with 'Famous Fighters' in the border. Fantastic Jo Kotula artwork. Kit features moving hull and conning tower planes, display stand and a removable hatch revealing bulkheads and reactor detail. Molded in gloss black. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes decals and instructions.

Aurora SSN Sea Wolf SSN575 Atomic Powered Guided Missile Submarine, 1/242, 706-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG

$145   

Hard-to-find 1957 hard box issue. This is the first issue of the Seawolf and has dramatic Jo Kotula artwork. Molded in glossy black plastic. Includes bow and stern diving planes, twin props, periscopes and masts, missile storage tank, guided missile and launch rail and display stand. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts, decals and instructions.

Aurora USS Skipjack Submarine Phota-Scope Issue, 1/228, 614-180

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$125   

Rare. 1970 issue featuring the Phota-Scope. In place of the nuclear reactor, Aurora put a tube that has a magnifying lens at the top and a film transparency of a submarine interior at the bottom. So when you lift the hatch, you looked through the magnifier to see the inside of the sub. It was an interesting idea, and Aurora extended Phota-scope to some tank kits around the same time. The kit has never been started. Inventoried with all parts, magnifying lens and tube, phota-scope picture, decals and correct instructions present. The box looks much better than the 'good' rating but is graded as such because there is a closed tear in the box top at the sail of the sub.

Aurora Atomic Submarine SSN Nautilus SSN-571 First Under The North Pole, 1/242, 708-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$110   

1958 issue with fantastic 'North Pole' box artwork by Jo Kotula. Molded in the correct high gloss black plastic. This kit has never been started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts, decals and instructions.

Aurora Atomic Submarine Nautilus SS571, 1/242, 500-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$165   

Rare, Brooklyn-produced, early 1950s U-Ma-Kit. This was Aurora's first naval model. Molded in the correct glossy very dark gray plastic and includes a display stand and decals to match the box art. Never started and complete with all parts, 'very good++' condition decals and 'mint' instructions. The box has excellent color, four solid corners with no repairs, no fading and no price tags. The only tape is the factory sealing tape on the long sides. There is a light grease pencil price at the top center as shown and general shelf/edge wear.

Aurora Atomic Submarine Nautilus SS571, 1/242, 500-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$148   

Rare, Brooklyn-produced early 1950s U-Ma-Kit. This was Aurora's first naval model. Molded in the correct glossy very dark gray plastic. The kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts and includes decals and instructions. Even includes the original factory packing tissue and a small, unopened metal tube of glue. The box looks better than the 'good-' rating but is graded as such because there are closed tears in the box top on the left, light stains and general moderate wear throughout.

Aurora Atomic Submarine Nautilus SS571, 1/242, 500-98

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Poor

$58   

NOTE: builder or parts kit only, please read carefully. Rare, Brooklyn-produced early 1950s U-Ma-Kit. This was Aurora's first naval model. Molded in the correct glossy very dark gray plastic. The kit has never been started. NOTE: missing parts. Both bow dive planes and one prop are missing. NOTE: decals have been cut out and are missing (2) eyeballs and one shark's mouth. Otherwise inventoried with all other parts, decals (separated) and instructions. NOTE: instructions are present but completely split in two down one fold seam. The box looks better than the 'poor' rating but is graded as such because there is extensive clear tape holding the top together, stains and missing litho as shown at the bottom and on the bottom long side. The tray (lower box) is present but split along most seams.

Aurora Flying Sub Test Shot - Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (Seaview Submarine) Bagged, 1/60

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Poor

$275   

Very rare item for the advanced collector. This item was from the estate of Dave Cockrum, the world-famous Aurora box artist, sculpture and kit designer. However, he is even more famous for his long history with DC and Marvel Comics. When working at Aurora, Dave had access to 'The Room'. In it were test shots from almost every Aurora kit ever made; employees were welcome to come in and take a kit when they pleased. This Flying Sub came from that room. It is a rare test shot molded in the usual test shot color - white- and includes the clear parts. Although the kit is complete, it does not have a box or instructions like most all test shots.

Aurora German Sea Raider Atlantis, 1/456, 710-249

Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc +++

$900   

First issue. The hardbox is dated 1959 and has the "Famous Fighters" in the oval 'Northern Lights' logo. This is the only kit made of the infamous German WWII converted merchant raider which was the subject of several books and a major movie called 'Under Ten Flags.' The long WWII voyage was legendary, and the ship is well represented in this full-hull model. Covers can be removed to reveal hidden guns, torpedo tubes and the Ar-196 floatplane. Never started. Inventoried 100% complete with all parts, decals and instructions present. From modeler Stephen Payne: Recommend that the builder or collector of this kit add the following books to their collection-The German Raider Atlantis by Captain Bernhard Rogge & Wolfgang Frank & Sea Raider Atlantis, Story of a German Surface Raider by Ulrich Mohr & A.V. Sellwood. The first book is by the ATLANTIS commander, Kapitan zur See Bernhard Rogge. He oversaw the transformation and outfitting in Bremen and captained the ship during her 602 day operational voyager which sank or captured 22 ships totaling 144,384 t (142,104 long tons). Rogge also was one of the few German officers of flag rank who was not arrested by the Allies after the war due to the way he had exercised his command of Atlantis. Captain J. Armstrong White, captain of the British CITY OF BAGHDAD, which Atlantis sank in July 1941, stated, "His treatment of prisoners left respect, instead of hatred."The second book is by the ATLANTIS First Officer, Ulrich Moher. Both books read much the same as the events related are the same, but it is interesting to see these events from the two perspectives. Captain White (see above) wrote the foreword to Atlantis, the Story of a German Surface Raider, written by U. Mohr & A. V. Sellwood.The German auxiliary cruiser Atlantis (HSK 2), known to the Kriegsmarine as Schiff 16 (SHIP 16) and to the Royal Navy as Raider-C, was a converted merchant vessel to German Hilfskreuzer (auxiliary cruiser) used for commerce raiding. Commerce raiders did not seek to engage warships, but rather attack enemy merchant shipping; the measures of success are tonnage destroyed (or captured) and time spent "at large" holding up enemy resources. Atlantis had the longest raiding career of any German commerce raider in either world war.